Be the Choice Pilot Study: University of Ottawa

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Selam Ogbalidet (MD2022), Mina Boshra (MD2022), and Melanie Grondin (MD/PhD), three medical students at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, are conducting a pilot study that seeks to evaluate the utility of the Be the Choice (BTC) Decision Trees for patients with breast cancer who are undergoing breast reconstruction.  Alongside Dr. Jing Zhang, staff […]

Executive Director Named to Order of Ontario

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On January 1st, 2021, our Executive Director, Prof. Melanie Adrian, was appointed to the 2019 Order of Ontario. The Order of Ontario is the province’s highest civilian honour. Prof. Adrian has demonstrated excellence and achievement through her work as a scholar, activist and human rights professor. She is the co-founder and Executive Director of Be […]

A Note on COVID-19

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At Be the Choice, we’ve always said that cancer patients need choices now more than ever before. This is especially true in the COVID-19 era. COVID has placed an immense burden on our health care system, resulting in delayed treatments, cancelled surgeries and postponed appointments.  As we try to cope (and beat) COVID-19, cancer patients […]

New Year, New Body, New Boob(s)

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The ball is about to drop. Whilst many will be celebrating the turn of 2019, this will be a very different year for the 27,000 or so Canadians who will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Once breast cancer has been confirmed, the first treatment option is often surgery. No matter how skilled your surgeon, it […]

Robin Beasley: Seeds of the Trees

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Many of my first appointments in the cancer world were just a blur. I would sit, terrified, in these sterile clinic rooms wanting something to focus on besides the fact that a doctor would come through the door at any moment and throw some scary words out there. Words like aggressive and invasive, radiation and […]

Brettel Dawson: On Be the Choice

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I was diagnosed with breast cancer in February 2016. My understanding of the language of breast cancer that allowed me to fully comprehend my diagnosis and treatment options, came long after the news. Long after the radiologist told me that my mammogram was “highly suspicious for cancer.” Long after the surgeon doing my breast biopsy […]